What are Boreholes?

What are Boreholes?

Boreholes are a long, narrow wells drilled to access underground water in aquifers. Boreholes are covered with hand-pumps to prevent contamination and for ease of access. Before a borehole can be constructed, technicians and other interested parties must work together to find the ideal location and run various tests to ensure that the operation goes smoothly.

How do Boreholes Work?

Groundwater is still a large constituent of the total amount of drinking water in South Africa. In most areas more water is available than is necessary to pump out, and this ensures a steady water supply and does not have any adverse environmental effects.

It is important to ensure that the underground store of water does not become contaminated during borehole installations. The below methodology is often used to ensure as clean an operation as possible.

Drill & Line

A borehole is drilled and lined with a well screen and casing.

Filter

An annulus is placed around the screen and thereafter packed with the appropriate matter to act as a filter.

Seal

Surface water – which may be contaminated – is then prevented from entering the borehole by adding a seal or a series of seals.

Chamber and Pump

A chamber (which itself is also sealed) is then installed. This houses the well head and surface valves. A stainless steel pump (there are varying sizes and types) is then inserted to the chamber. This pump is most often powered by electricity, solar or wind.

Water Quality and Safety

A water sample should be sent to a laboratory for analysis. This will check for any harmful pollutants, and can also determine the quality of the water. PH and other levels can also be tested.

Clearwater Pumps

Clearwater Pumps are a water solutions company based in Centurion and available at short notice in Gauteng and Cape Town. Clearwater Pumps also assist clients with water pump designs and solutions in other provinces if given proper notice. Projects have taken us to: Limpopo, Eastern Cape, North West, Kwazulu Natal and Mpumalanga.

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